There’s an interesting article on MOOCS by James G. Mazoue entitled The MOOC Model: Challenging Traditional Education where he discusses MOOCs.

Here are the keypoints he identifies:

  • A turning point will occur in the higher education model when a MOOC-based program of study leads to a degree from an accredited institution — a trend that has already begun to develop.
  • Addressing the quality of the learning experience that MOOCs provide is therefore of paramount importance to their credibility and acceptance.
  • MOOCs represent a postindustrial model of teaching and learning that has the potential to undermine and replace the business model of institutions that depend on recruiting and retaining students for location-bound, proprietary forms of campus-based learning.

 

I really like the creative way David Lee King‘s library looked at publishing their online annual report.

What could have been a boring link to a pdf document ended up being a pop-up interactive book – it still gives you all the fact you need, but in a really creative way.

Here’s the link to the full annual report.

I love this idea for library name tags that I found on Tame The Web

I love how it goes against the stereotypical idea of librarians as being boring, old-fashioned, fuddy-duddy people!

I think mine would read:

Sophie van der Walt

AKA …

- camper

- amateur cook

- wild life enthusiast

- lover of pina coladas

Over at Free Technology for Teachers I stumbled upon the InfoGraphic below illustrating which generations (GenY, GenX, Baby Boomers, Silents) use social media most.

(Click on the image to enlarge or go to this link).

What I found interesting is the last comment made in the post:

This infographic confirms what many of us already know, kids are creating and consuming content online at a higher rate than their teachers and parents.

I found it interesting because at Tuesday’s conference Arthur Goldstuck, CEO of WorldWideWorx research, talked about what his company is calling the Digital Participation Curve.

The Digital Participation Curve argues that it takes people (on average) 5 years to get comfortable enough with internet technologies to start contributing content – whether it be on blogs, fb, social media sites etc.

So by this logic, the younger generation should be the ones to contribute more as they’ve had more constant experience with these technologies.

Information Is Beautiful posted a terrific InfoGraphic about what the countries from around the world are best known for.

Unfortunately, South Africa is not listed at being known for its wild life, beauty or friendly people … nope our claim to fame according to the graphic is Assaults. :( And while I can’t really argue with that it does make me sad, because my country is so much more than that!

(But then I saw that Tajikistan is known for intestinal diseases; Senegal for rain and Mexico for television – so I didn’t feel that bad anymore!)

Click on the image to enlarge it or click here to go to the interactive version of the InfoGraphic.

Want to find a great image of a news event that’s just happened? Free Technology for Teachers put me on the path of NachoFoto.

NachoFoto is an image search engine designed to bring you the latest images from across the web on emerging trends and breaking stories.

At the moment the Trending Topics they have images for are:

Afriqiyah Plane Crash 12th May 2010 Pictures Bay to Breakers Pictures Cannes Film Festival Pictures Elections in the United Kingdom Pictures Miss USA 2010 Pictures Oklahoma tornado outbreak 10th May 2010 Pictures Open Air Mass At Fhatima 13th May 2010 Pictures Quebec landslide 11th May 2010 Pictures Series Of Explosions Hit Iraq 10th May 2010 Pictures Thai Anti Government Protest 2010 Pictures Uranium Exchange Program 17th May 2010 Pictures Wall Street reform Pictures War in Somalia 2009 Pictures

It can offer great images to link to current events/topics and you can use the NachoFoto’s timeline slider to look back at images taken over the course of the development of a news story.

The folks over at EduCause has published another publication in their 7 Things You Should Know … series. This time it is about mobile apps used for learning and like all the other publications in the series the go through :

  1. What is it?
  2. How does it work?
  3. Who’s doing it?
  4. Why is it significant?
  5. What are the downsides?
  6. Where is it going?
  7. What are the implications for teaching and
    learning?
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