click on image for copyright detail

click on image for copyright detail

JISC recently published the final report from the Learning Literacies for the Digital Age (LLiDA) project, which was set up to examine the kinds of skills and capabilities students need to have to get the full benefit of the technology and resources available to support their learning and the differing ways in which institutions supported the acquisition of these.

While that sentence is a mouthful to be sure, the recommendations are what interested me most as it is clear that flexibility and adaptability is going to become a given characteristic of teachers/librarians (the bolding is mine).

In supporting digital and learning literacies, support staff and curriculum teams should:

  1. Design flexible learning opportunities
  2. Situate those learning opportunities, where possible and appropriate, in authentic contexts (workplace, community, placement)
  3. Design learning opportunities for highly interconnected individuals, operating in distributed networks of expertise
  4. Continually review how technologies are integrated into curriculum tasks
  5. Continually review learners’ techno-social practices and the practices of professional and scholarly communities (anticipating that these will be different and that helping learners negotiate the differences will become part of the pedagogic agenda)
  6. Support learners to use their own technologies and to develop effective strategies for learning with technology
  7. Use assessment and feedback to encourage innovation in learners’ approaches to study, rewarding exploration as a process: current assessment regimes often reward conservatism
  8. Support learners’ developing self-efficacy and self-direction in learning, empowering them to navigate increasingly complex learning landscapes
  9. Support learners’ personal reflection, progression and planning, for example by engaging with e-portfolios and learning records