visuals


Information Is Beautiful posted a terrific InfoGraphic about what the countries from around the world are best known for.

Unfortunately, South Africa is not listed at being known for its wild life, beauty or friendly people … nope our claim to fame according to the graphic is Assaults. 😦 And while I can’t really argue with that it does make me sad, because my country is so much more than that!

(But then I saw that Tajikistan is known for intestinal diseases; Senegal for rain and Mexico for television – so I didn’t feel that bad anymore!)

Click on the image to enlarge it or click here to go to the interactive version of the InfoGraphic.

Twitter reached it’s 10 billionth tweet the other day and Mashable designed a great infographic to show the evolution of the tweet.

By now you should have realised that I love visualisations and the Information is Beautiful blog – I find David’s visualisations beautiful and interesting. And his newest one does not disappoint it’s a generative data-visualisation of all the scientific evidence for popular health supplements by David McCandless and Andy Perkins.

They’ve made both an interactive and a static version – below is the static version, but do check out the interactive one.

Free posters? Jup, the UN Environment Programme has a series of free posters you can download (in PDF) compiled from the UNEP’s Geo Data Portal

The full-colour posters are divided into four main groups:

  1. Basic Facts posters
  2. InfoGraphics posters
  3. ISO Code posters
  4. Bubble Chart posters

The Basic Facts posters contain 9 posters covering: electricity consumption; ecosystem management; hazardous waste management; global environment treaties; forest management; carbon dioxide emissions; fisheries; waste management and recycling and electricity production

The InfoGraphics posters contain 13 posters covering: global environmental indicators; recycling rates of OECD countries; global CO2 emissions and wealth; total CO2 emissions; total final energy consumption; marine fish catch; global total and capita CO2 emissions; energy supplies and FCS forests.

The ISO Code posters contain 9 posters covering: global CO2 emissions; global water footprints; global ecological footprint; world heritage sites and energy supply per $1000 GDP (PPP)

The Bubble Chart posters contain 3 posters covering: CO2 emissions and wealth

StatPlanet is a browser-based interactive data visualization and mapping tool. You use it to create interactive thematic maps, interactive graphs, and feature-rich interactive infographics – it’s super easy to use!

It is used by UNESCO and SACMEQ, NGOs, Fortune 500 companies and government departments.

It comes with up-to-date statistics on demography, economy, education, environment & energy, gender and health, for most countries in the world. You can use it online or download it.

David McCandless, from Information Is Beautiful (one of my favorite blogs) posted the above infographic to illustrate the dangers of rising sea levels. (click on here to go to a bigger version)

In the graphic he’s tried to

sum up all the current research on sea level rises. What will happen, when it will happen, and where all that sea water will come from. And to suggest what cities will flood When Sea Levels Attack!

Wouldn’t it be cool if you could visualize social bookmarking tags instead of viewing them in their current flat state?

Well, Joris Klerkx and Erik Duval felt so and so they designed a system that “attempts to visualize these structures, so that end users can explore the social bookmarks in a playful, efficient and flexible way.”

I tried it and it really is a fun way to see what’s going on in the del.icio.us system. To download the program click here, to read their paper click here.

(Thanks to visualcomplexity.com for posting this originally)

Next Page »