I really like the creative way David Lee King‘s library looked at publishing their online annual report.

What could have been a boring link to a pdf document ended up being a pop-up interactive book – it still gives you all the fact you need, but in a really creative way.

Here’s the link to the full annual report.

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Want to find a great image of a news event that’s just happened? Free Technology for Teachers put me on the path of NachoFoto.

NachoFoto is an image search engine designed to bring you the latest images from across the web on emerging trends and breaking stories.

At the moment the Trending Topics they have images for are:

Afriqiyah Plane Crash 12th May 2010 Pictures Bay to Breakers Pictures Cannes Film Festival Pictures Elections in the United Kingdom Pictures Miss USA 2010 Pictures Oklahoma tornado outbreak 10th May 2010 Pictures Open Air Mass At Fhatima 13th May 2010 Pictures Quebec landslide 11th May 2010 Pictures Series Of Explosions Hit Iraq 10th May 2010 Pictures Thai Anti Government Protest 2010 Pictures Uranium Exchange Program 17th May 2010 Pictures Wall Street reform Pictures War in Somalia 2009 Pictures

It can offer great images to link to current events/topics and you can use the NachoFoto’s timeline slider to look back at images taken over the course of the development of a news story.

This is not only a gorgeous graphic, but lets you listen to the sounds of the solar system!

(click on the link below to go to the website and listen)

Thanks to Information is Beautiful for posting this.

You can now explore the British Library’s Virtual Books collection via their online gallery:

Explore the British Library here

Sony PRS-505 by florianmarquart, on Flickr
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 Generic License
HighWire released the E-Book survey 2010 this week and while some of the findings are not entirely new (simplicity and ease of use are ebook features that are valued by librarians, over and above more sophisticated end‐user features) it really includes some interesting stuff.
Here are a few of the highlights:
  • Traditional sources of book discovery continue to be important for ebooks as well. Librarians find and learn about ebooks from book vendors and by inclusion in content bundles. They believe that users discover ebooks through the library catalog and through Internet search engines.
  • Participants indicated that users prefer ebooks in PDF format, but as one participant stated, format preference will change as technology changes.
  • Digital rights management is the single most important factor that hinders ebook use for library patrons.
  • Purchase with perpetual access is the most acceptable business model for ebooks, with 83% of participants indicating that this model is very acceptable. However, significant numbers of participants indicated that other very different models are also acceptable.
Survey responses indicate that librarians learn about ebooks in a variety of ways, but that actions by publishers and book vendors are very important in the process. Book vendors and inclusion in content packages were most frequently marked as very significant methods for learning about ebooks. However, these methods were also frequently marked as significant or very significant: request from patron (54), colleagues (57), reference in the research literature (56), inclusion in content package (74), book vendor (77), and publisher marketing material (68).
Users discover ebooks through the library catalog and through Internet search engines
It really is worth reading!

EduCause released their newest installment in the 7 Things You Should Know About … series and this one is about E-readers.

It sketches a scenario about E-readers and then goes on to explain:

  1. What it is
  2. How it works
  3. Who is doing it
  4. Why is it significant?
  5. What are the downsides?
  6. Where is it going?
  7. What are the implications for learning and teachings

It really is a very informative overview of E-readers, especially if you’ve never really paid attention to them.

Free Technology for Teachers posted a great link to PaperRater a free service designed to help high school and college students improve their writing. It checks your spelling and grammar but also checks for plagiarism – almost like TurnItIn that most South African universities use.

Paper Rater scans students’ papers then gives students an estimate of the likelihood that someone might think that their papers were plagiarized. Some of the other useful features of Paper Rater are style indicators, word choice evaluators, and a vocabulary sophistication indicator

Applications for Education
Paper Rater could be a valuable tool for high school students to run their papers through before turning them in for a grade. Paper Rater can make students aware of potential acts of plagiarism. Paper Rater can also make students aware of changes in vocabulary that they may want to make before submitting their final papers.

To use the service you have to register, but it’s free and an easy process. It took seconds for me to upload a document and see Paper Rater‘s comments: