I really like the creative way David Lee King‘s library looked at publishing their online annual report.

What could have been a boring link to a pdf document ended up being a pop-up interactive book – it still gives you all the fact you need, but in a really creative way.

Here’s the link to the full annual report.

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The folks over at EduCause has published another publication in their 7 Things You Should Know … series. This time it is about mobile apps used for learning and like all the other publications in the series the go through :

  1. What is it?
  2. How does it work?
  3. Who’s doing it?
  4. Why is it significant?
  5. What are the downsides?
  6. Where is it going?
  7. What are the implications for teaching and
    learning?

I just got back from speaking at two conferences – one was a university faculty conference and the other a library conference from the library I used to work at.

I spoke about the findings of my Masters’ studies on generational awareness in academic libraries in South Africa twice and co-presented a paper on using e-posters to teach research methodology to honors students. (I’ll try to post both presentations today or tomorrow)

It went really well, and this morning when I read Roy Tennant’s post Thoughts on Speaking where he mentions another post on “30 Quick Tips for Speakers (now 35!)” that gives a few tips on presenting and speaking I thought I’d add my 2 c worth:

2. The power is not the point – slides are there as navigation points, not to be the content – I couldn’t agree more! the presentations that resonated with me where the ones that were text light but the presenter was knowledgeable enough not to need a text heavy slide

4. There is a high demand for people who can both provide content and deliver it effectively from stage. Some can do one of the two, most don’t do either and a select few do both. Aim to be great. Amen! Great content can get lost/spoiled if the presenter can’t deliver well. Practice untill you find your presenting voice and don’t try to imitate somebody else’s style

15. Have passion for what you’re saying. If you don’t, your audience won’t either. I experienced this in all three my presentations. Because I was passionate about my topic and thought it was really interesting the audience responded very well too and ended up asking really interesting/thought-provoking questions

20. Change your presentation every time. Update stats, bring new examples. Own the content, not repeat it. I agree with this. Even though there was only one person in audience who attended both of my solo presentation I changed some of the slides, added some videos and cartoons and made sure that it looked and felt different and new

33. Tell great stories (your own, not someone else’s), and be funny. Don’t tell jokes, but use humor. (From Ava Diamond Site / Twitter) People respond better to you as a speaker if you can humanize yourself, so I always try to use humor (even at my expense) to show that I’m just a normal 30-year-old

I like presenting not just because I like to talk so much 🙂 but because of the incredible feedback and vibes you get when presenting. It’s a chance to tell people “here’s what I did/think – what do you think about it” and that leads to some really interesting meetings and people!

You can now explore the British Library’s Virtual Books collection via their online gallery:

Explore the British Library here

Sony PRS-505 by florianmarquart, on Flickr
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 Generic License
HighWire released the E-Book survey 2010 this week and while some of the findings are not entirely new (simplicity and ease of use are ebook features that are valued by librarians, over and above more sophisticated end‐user features) it really includes some interesting stuff.
Here are a few of the highlights:
  • Traditional sources of book discovery continue to be important for ebooks as well. Librarians find and learn about ebooks from book vendors and by inclusion in content bundles. They believe that users discover ebooks through the library catalog and through Internet search engines.
  • Participants indicated that users prefer ebooks in PDF format, but as one participant stated, format preference will change as technology changes.
  • Digital rights management is the single most important factor that hinders ebook use for library patrons.
  • Purchase with perpetual access is the most acceptable business model for ebooks, with 83% of participants indicating that this model is very acceptable. However, significant numbers of participants indicated that other very different models are also acceptable.
Survey responses indicate that librarians learn about ebooks in a variety of ways, but that actions by publishers and book vendors are very important in the process. Book vendors and inclusion in content packages were most frequently marked as very significant methods for learning about ebooks. However, these methods were also frequently marked as significant or very significant: request from patron (54), colleagues (57), reference in the research literature (56), inclusion in content package (74), book vendor (77), and publisher marketing material (68).
Users discover ebooks through the library catalog and through Internet search engines
It really is worth reading!

The Harvard College Library has digitized thousands of historical photographs, pamphlets, manuscripts, books, music scores, rare maps and other rare and unique materials. The vast majority of these images are freely available online for public access.

The easiest way to lose yourself in their collections is to Explore the Collections – they have various themes that you can chose from:

Of course my eye was caught by the Images of Colonialism – Africa and Asia and there are some great images from newspapers etc.

Thanks to Cheryl LaGuardia for alerting me on this.

Free posters? Jup, the UN Environment Programme has a series of free posters you can download (in PDF) compiled from the UNEP’s Geo Data Portal

The full-colour posters are divided into four main groups:

  1. Basic Facts posters
  2. InfoGraphics posters
  3. ISO Code posters
  4. Bubble Chart posters

The Basic Facts posters contain 9 posters covering: electricity consumption; ecosystem management; hazardous waste management; global environment treaties; forest management; carbon dioxide emissions; fisheries; waste management and recycling and electricity production

The InfoGraphics posters contain 13 posters covering: global environmental indicators; recycling rates of OECD countries; global CO2 emissions and wealth; total CO2 emissions; total final energy consumption; marine fish catch; global total and capita CO2 emissions; energy supplies and FCS forests.

The ISO Code posters contain 9 posters covering: global CO2 emissions; global water footprints; global ecological footprint; world heritage sites and energy supply per $1000 GDP (PPP)

The Bubble Chart posters contain 3 posters covering: CO2 emissions and wealth