Over at Free Technology for Teachers I stumbled upon the InfoGraphic below illustrating which generations (GenY, GenX, Baby Boomers, Silents) use social media most.

(Click on the image to enlarge or go to this link).

What I found interesting is the last comment made in the post:

This infographic confirms what many of us already know, kids are creating and consuming content online at a higher rate than their teachers and parents.

I found it interesting because at Tuesday’s conference Arthur Goldstuck, CEO of WorldWideWorx research, talked about what his company is calling the Digital Participation Curve.

The Digital Participation Curve argues that it takes people (on average) 5 years to get comfortable enough with internet technologies to start contributing content – whether it be on blogs, fb, social media sites etc.

So by this logic, the younger generation should be the ones to contribute more as they’ve had more constant experience with these technologies.

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Information Is Beautiful posted a terrific InfoGraphic about what the countries from around the world are best known for.

Unfortunately, South Africa is not listed at being known for its wild life, beauty or friendly people … nope our claim to fame according to the graphic is Assaults. 😦 And while I can’t really argue with that it does make me sad, because my country is so much more than that!

(But then I saw that Tajikistan is known for intestinal diseases; Senegal for rain and Mexico for television – so I didn’t feel that bad anymore!)

Click on the image to enlarge it or click here to go to the interactive version of the InfoGraphic.

This is not only a gorgeous graphic, but lets you listen to the sounds of the solar system!

(click on the link below to go to the website and listen)

Thanks to Information is Beautiful for posting this.

Twitter reached it’s 10 billionth tweet the other day and Mashable designed a great infographic to show the evolution of the tweet.

Next time someone asks me about Web 2.0 and it’s uses in the library I’ll be directing them to the image below (uploaded by Henley: Collective Intelligence v stupidity and I saw it on Stephen’s Lighthouse).

Because honestly, this really is how libraries sometimes plan and manage their web projects …

The Harvard College Library has digitized thousands of historical photographs, pamphlets, manuscripts, books, music scores, rare maps and other rare and unique materials. The vast majority of these images are freely available online for public access.

The easiest way to lose yourself in their collections is to Explore the Collections – they have various themes that you can chose from:

Of course my eye was caught by the Images of Colonialism – Africa and Asia and there are some great images from newspapers etc.

Thanks to Cheryl LaGuardia for alerting me on this.

By now you should have realised that I love visualisations and the Information is Beautiful blog – I find David’s visualisations beautiful and interesting. And his newest one does not disappoint it’s a generative data-visualisation of all the scientific evidence for popular health supplements by David McCandless and Andy Perkins.

They’ve made both an interactive and a static version – below is the static version, but do check out the interactive one.